Wednesday, August 02, 2006

I know, I know--it's serious

On the first Halloween we were married, Steve and I went to see Morrissey at the Saltair Palace in Salt Lake. It was a bit of a freak show, as one might expect: costumes of all degrees of scariness. I wore open-toed shoes. What was I thinking? Ouch.

This girl on the internet saw him a month previous in Toronto, but our impressions of the concert were similar: "On September 12th, 1997, my boyfriend and I saw Morrissey at Massey Hall in Toronto, Canada. This was the very first time either one of us had seen him live, sat on the third tier overlooking the stage. We're fans but not fanatical. We were both mezmerized but Brian more than I, every time I looked over at him, he had this silly grin on his face. Most of the songs were from his new album and unknown to us. It didn't matter that we couldn't sing along, we were watching a man we'd grown up with, we'd listened to, connected with in our own way and loved. After a 1/2 song encore when fans jumped on stage and grabbed him, the thugs rushed him off the stage lest he be injured afterwhich massive booing resounded, we went to the nearest pub which had Guiness on tap." Except for the Guiness part.

The M played for all of about 45 minutes. We didn't know all the songs, but the vibe was hot. Morrissey did some funky things with the microphone. He did some funky Morrissey-ish dance moves. A few fans jumped onstage and were escorted off by the security guards. Then, Morrissey reached out and grabbed a fan and pulled him onstage, and the security guards escorted Morrissey off, and the lights came on. Wha-? It was way too short. We felt pretty gypped. And no Halloween candy that year.

We just signed up for Netflix. Our first DVD: New York Doll.

Morrissey is so cool.

9 comments:

elasticwaistbandlady said...

My kids are so very accustomed to The Smiths and the easily distinguishable voice of Morrissey, that no matter what song from their massive catalog pops up on satellite radio, they know instinctively that it's him. I love that! No, reforming his image, no outlandish gimmicks, no "experimental" phases, and picking up faddish trends, just plain Morrissey continuity.....

Madonna, come down off your ridiculous mirror ball cross and learn something from Morrissey. Please.

sarah said...

so what's with the walk down Morrissey-lane? Did I miss something?

Emily said...

EWBL: I wouldn't go so far as to say Morrissey is the epitome of normalcy and stability. I think he has some gimmicks up his sleeve.

Sarah: He's in that movie we watched. It's really good. If you EVER SIGN UP FOR YOUR (FREE) NETFLIX, you can watch it, too.

ahc said...

That was really random, Emily. . .

Emily said...

I'm so misunderstood.

sarah said...

He's in New York Doll? Why did I think that was a mormon-genre flick? per Austin's website?

Abby said...

I enjoyed the Morrissey memory. During my film class last year my professor said one day, "I NEVER recommend movies to my students, but you all need to go see 'New York Doll.'" Is it that good? And by the by, how do you get Netflix free?

n said...

"This might be the only documentary that will appeal to punks and Mormons alike." -tv guide

haven't seen that one yet but i did enjoy slc punk (which probably appeals more to punks than mormons)

elasticwaistbandlady said...

Yeah, Emily, he's a little quirky, but he's consistently quirky.

His music's the same, the hair is the same(except for the thinning), his act is the same.